Futurama Comics

Futurama Comics is a comic book series published by Bongo Comics and based on the television series Futurama. It has been published bi-monthly in the United States since November 2000 (apart from a brief break for the crossover). It has been published in the United Kingdom (with an altered order) and Australia since 2002 and four trade paperbacks have been released. During the production hiatus between 2003 and 2006 it was the only new Futurama material being made.

What is Futurama about?

In the year 3000, the crew of the Planet Express delivery company make cargo shipments to unusual planets, as well as having adventures back on Earth. The main characters include Philip J. Fry, a slacker from the 20th century who was cryonically frozen for 1,000 years, cycloptic ship captain Leela, and an alcohol-fueled, troublemaking robot Bender.

Click on the following links to download and read:

Futurama Comics #52 – Ro-Botox

Futurama Comics #11 – The Cure for the Common Clod

Futurama Comics #05 – Who’s Dying To Be A Gazillionaire

Futurama Comics #01 – Monkey Sea, Monkey Doom!

Kingdom Come (0 to 3)

Kingdom Come is a four-issue comic book mini-series published in 1996 by DC Comics under their Elseworlds imprint. It was written by Alex Ross and Mark Waid and painted in gouache by Ross, who also developed the concept from an original idea. This Elseworlds story is set in a future that deals with a growing conflict between “traditional” superheroes, such as Superman, Wonder Woman, and the Justice League, and a growing population of largely amoral and dangerously irresponsible new vigilantes, in many cases the offspring of the traditional heroes. Between these two groups is Batman and his assembled team, who attempt to contain the escalating disaster, foil the machinations of Lex Luthor, and prevent a world-ending superhuman war.

Hit the link below to download and read the files.

Introduction

Kingdom Come #0

Chapter One

Kingdom Come #1

Chapter Two

Kingdom Come #2

Chapter Three

Kingdom Come #3

Technology & Futurology

The following articles comment on different technological devices and aspects from the film Minority Report. The first one was written the same year the film was premiered. The second one, eight years later:

“A look at future technology in Minority Report (The Guardian)”
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2002/jul/22/features.neilmcintosh

“Why Minority Report was so spot on (The Guardian)”
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2010/jun/16/minority-report-technology-comes-true

The following is a wikipedia entry on the topic (you don’t need to print this one):

“Technologies in Minority Report”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technologies_in_Minority_Report

World War Z: An oral history of the zombie war

World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War is a 2006 apocalyptic horror novel by Max Brooks. The novel is a collection of individual accounts, where the narrator is an agent of the United Nations Postwar Commission following the global conflict against the zombie plague. Other passages record a decade-long desperate struggle, as experienced by people of various nationalities. The personal accounts also describe the social, political, religious, and environmental changes that resulted from the devastating war.

WWZ

Click the link below to download and read the file.

World War Z_ An Oral History of the Zombie War – Max Brooks-viny

The Dark Knight Returns (complete)

Dark Knight

The Dark Knight Returns is a 1986 four-issue comic book miniseries starring Batman, written by Frank Miller, illustrated by Miller and Klaus Janson, and published by DC Comics. When the series was collected into a single volume later that year, the story title for the first issue was applied to the entire series. The Dark Knight Returns tells the story of Bruce Wayne, who at 55 years old returns from retirement to fight crime and faces opposition from the Gotham City police force and the United States government.

Download the file below and enjoy!

Batman – The Dark Knight Returns

Film Speeches

Film speeches are normally delivered orally and directed at an audience of three or more people, although there can be exceptions, such as voice-over narrations. They are usually persuasive-type speeches, either designed to promote or to dissuade. Examples of types of speeches and monologues included here:

Types of Speeches and Monologues
  • voice-over narrated film introductions and closings
  • Presidential speeches
  • election-related political speeches
  • campaigns and debates
  • legends, fables, origin stories
  • life philosophies
  • vows of love
  • fantasies
  • confrontations
  • denunciations
  • inspirational thoughts
  • intimate confessions
  • outspoken diatribes
  • sad farewells
  • poignant eulogies
  • courtroom openings and summations
  • public addresses

Click on the link below to access the file. Download it and choose.

Monologues